Ranks of the Russian Air Force

The Russian Air Force is a partial force of the Russian army with a strength of about 185,000 men.

In addition to the Air Force, the air force also includes interceptors and ground-based air defense systems. In addition, they belong to the army aviators, the naval aviators are subordinate to the Navy directly. Like the navy and the army, the Air Force is divided into 6 military districts.

 

Russian team's ranks

- рядово́й (Soldier)
- ефре́йтор (Private first class)

Russian team's ranks

Russian team's ranks

рядово́й (Soldier) (1), ефре́йтор (Private first class) (2)

 

 

Russian noncommissioned officer's ranks

- мла́дший сержа́нт (Non-commissioned officer)
- сержа́нт (Sergeant)
- ста́рший сержа́нт (Technical sergeant)
- старшина́ (Csm)

Russian noncommissioned officer's ranks

Russian noncommissioned officer's ranks

мла́дший сержа́нт (Non-commissioned officer) (3), сержа́нт (Sergeant) (4), ста́рший сержа́нт (Technical sergeant) (5), старшина́ (Csm) (6)

 

 

Russian Praporschtschik ranks

- пра́порщик (Praporschtschik, similarly rank wo1)
- ста́рший пра́порщик (Starschij Praporschtschik, similarly rank cw2)

Russian Praporschtschik ranks

Russian Praporschtschik ranks

пра́порщик (Praporschtschik, similarly rank wo1) (7), ста́рший пра́порщик (Starschij Praporschtschik, similarly rank cw2) (8)

 

 

Russian officer's ranks

- мла́дший лейтена́нт (Under second lieutenant)
- лейтена́нт (Second lieutenant)
- ста́рший лейтена́нт (First lieutenant)
- капита́н (Captain)
- майо́р (Major)
- подполко́вник (Lieutenant colonel)
- полко́вник (Colonel)

Russian officer's ranks

Russian officer's ranks

мла́дший лейтена́нт (Under second lieutenant) (9), лейтена́нт (Second lieutenant) (10), ста́рший лейтена́нт (First lieutenant) (11), капита́н (Captain) (12), майо́р (Major) (13), подполко́вник (Lieutenant colonel) (14), полко́вник (Colonel) (15)

 

 

Russian general ranks

- генера́л-майо́р (Major general)
- генера́л-лейтена́нт (Lieutenant general)
- генера́л-полко́вник (Colonel general)
- генера́л а́рмий (Army general)

Russian general ranks

Russian general ranks

генера́л-майо́р (Major general) (16), генера́л-лейтена́нт (Lieutenant general) (17), генера́л-полко́вник (Colonel general) (18), генера́л а́рмий (Army general) (19)

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

Russia's Warplanes. Volume 1

Russia's Warplanes. Volume 1: Russia-made Military Aircraft and Helicopters Today: Volume 1 Paperback – November 19, 2015

Russia’s Warplanes is set to become the standard reference work on the subject. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this will serve as an exhaustive directory of the latest products of Russia’s military aviation industry. As well as outlining aircraft that currently equip the various Russian air arms, the first of two volumes also takes into account aircraft developed for and fielded by foreign states in the post-Soviet era.

Piotr Butowski provides authoritative technical descriptions for each military aircraft – and every significant sub-variant – currently available from Russia’s aerospace industry, or otherwise in large-scale service. With the level of accuracy and insight familiar to Harpia’s regular readers, each aircraft profile also includes specifications, and details of operators, upgrades, avionics and weapons.

The first of two volumes on the subject presents in-depth coverage of tactical combat aircraft, trainers, Army Aviation helicopters, reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft, airborne command posts and relay aircraft. As such, the breadth of this work extends from the latest multi-role fighters developed by Mikoyan and Sukhoi, via successive generations of combat rotorcraft, to airborne early warning and electronic intelligence-gatherers.

As well as familiar types such as the Su-30MK family of fighters and Mi-24/35 assault helicopters that have proven so successful on the export market, Russia’s Warplanes extends its reach to the various new and upgraded types that are beginning to populate Russia’s rejuvenated air arms, including those still under development, including the enigmatic ‘fifth-generation’ Sukhoi T-50 fighter.

Additional assets, including long-range bombers, maritime aircraft, strategic transport and tanker aircraft, theater and special purpose transports, and air-launched weapons will be dealt with in Volume 2.

Supplemented by many photographs, some of which from exclusive sources, as well as specially created maps and diagrams, Volume 1 of Russia’s Warplanes launches the most comprehensive study of the fixed- and rotary wing aircraft types – manned and unmanned – that can currently be found in Russian service or which are being built or offered for export.

Click here!

 

 

Russia's Warplanes. Volume 2

Russia's Warplanes. Volume 2: Russian-made Military Aircraft and Helicopters Today Paperback – December 16, 2016

Following the success of the first offering in the series, Harpia Publishing presents the second volume of Russia’s Warplanes, completing what has become a standard reference work on the subject. Once again researched and written by the acknowledged expert in the field, the book draws upon the author’s unrivaled connections within the Russian aerospace industry to conclude this comprehensive directory of the country’s latest military aviation hardware.

The result forms an essential companion to Volume 1, which detailed tactical combat aircraft, attack and transport helicopters, reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft, and special mission aircraft including airborne command posts and relay aircraft. Between them, the two works present in full detail the fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters that equip the various Russian air arms, as well as those developed for and operated by foreign states in the post-Soviet era.

Alongside technical descriptions for each military aircraft – and every significant sub-variant – currently available from Russia’s aerospace industry, or otherwise in large-scale service, Piotr Butowski provides historical background and accurate data relating to production and operators around the world. Full coverage is extended to upgrades, as well as the new avionics and advanced weapons that these introduce.

The second volume in the series is dedicated to long-range bombers – including the Tu-95MS and Tu-160 that recently made their combat debuts over Syria – maritime patrol and antisubmarine warfare aircraft, strategic transport and tanker aircraft, theater transports, and trainers. The work provides authoritative accounts of Russia’s current and future strategic bomber programs, as well as other fascinating types including the world’s largest military transport, the An-124, and the new-generation Yak-130 advanced trainer and light attack aircraft.

In common with previous Harpia titles, the book contains a wealth of high-quality photographs, many of which have never previously been published.

Click here!

 

 

Sukhoi Su-27 & 30/33/34/35

Sukhoi Su-27 & 30/33/34/35: Famous Russian Aircraft Hardcover – December 15, 2018

The Sukhoi Design Bureau was tasked in 1969 with developing a fourth-generation heavy fighter and thus began the story of the Su-27, known to the western world as the Flanker--an aircraft which turned out to be one of the most successful Soviet fighter designs.

This book tells the story of how the original project developed, how the final configuration of what was known as the T-10 was selected and why the brave decision to scrap the original project and rework it as the T-10S was taken, a decision that proved to be justified. The book covers the design and testing of the prototypes in both configurations, the production entry of the basic Su-27 single-seat fighter and the Su-27UB two-seat combat trainer together with the efforts of Sukhoi to keep them up to date with mid-life upgrades to Generation 4++' (Su-35S) level. The operational histories of Su-27 versions including the Su-30/Su-34/Su-35 are also described.

When the Soviet Navy decided to bolster its fleet with carriers optimized for conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) aircraft, Sukhoi responded by developing the Su-27K, which later entered service as the Su-33, Russia's first operational CTOL shipboard fighter. These naval variants are included in the book as is a chapter describing the story of how China purchased license manufacturing rights for the Su-27 and went on to develop its own versions with indigenous avionics and weapons, including the basic J-11 fighter and the J-15 Flying Shark--a clone of the Su-33.

The post-Soviet republics included, the Su-27/Su-30/Su-34/Su-35 family has seen service with nearly 20 nations, including places as far apart as Vietnam, Malaysia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Angola, India and Venezuela.

Click here!

 

 

Mil Mi-24 Attack Helicopter

Mil Mi-24 Attack Helicopter: In Soviet/Russian and Worldwide Service, 1972 to the Present 1st Edition

The Mil Mi-24 Soviet/Russian gunship and attack helicopter has been in continuous combat service since its first appearance in the early 1970s. Its impressive performance, ability to transport fully armed troops, and imposing armament soon earned the Mi-24 the nickname "Crocodile" and have made the big helicopter an opponent that is still feared to this day. The Mi-24's technical, developmental, and operational details, as well as upgrades and variants, all are discussed here. Included are discussions of all versions, armament, radio, radar warning and navigational equipment, and defense systems. Tactics and operations are also presented, with special emphasis on the Mi-24's service in Afghanistan from 1979 to 1989. Worldwide use by over 30 countries includes the air forces of Angola, Brazil, Cuba, India, Iraq, North Korea, Syria, Vietnam, Yemen, and others.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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