Bremen car (Bremer Wagen, Marienwagen)

With the outbreak of war, the high loss figures of soldiers and the increasing positional warfare on the Western Front, the German Ministry of War made it clear that armored vehicles were to be built to supply troops, to tow heavy artillery or to attack directly against enemy troops can be used.

As a result, on 19 July 1915, a contract was signed between the War Office and the engineer Hugo G. Bremer for the production of an intercity car to meet the relevant requirements of the Ministry.

About 1 year later on 6 October 1916, the prototype of the Bremen car was presented in Neheim. It was an ordinary 4-tonne truck instead of wheels had a total of 2 pairs of tracks, of which only the rear of the engine was driven.

 

Marienwagen

 

Marienwagen

 

 

Despite the production of 15 vehicles, the Bremen car could not convince the Ministry. Thus, the prototype was further developed to the Marienwagen in which the tail was improved, the drive, however, continued to reach only the rear pair, which often slipped the car in curves. This deficiency was remedied in retrospect by removing the front chain pair and replacing it with tires.

As the Marian car evolved, the need for such a vehicle became increasingly acute for the front. To make the Marienwagen I front-friendly, a 9mm thick armor was made around the case and put on. However, the chassis did not withstand this load, so that the vehicle was not operational. The order was canceled by the Ministry and the remaining chassis were used as carriers for anti-aircraft guns and anti-tank guns.

A later design for a Marienwagen III was not implemented.

 

 

Chassis of the Marienwagen

 

 

Marienwagen II with tires on the front axle

 

 

Marienwagen II 1919 in Berlin

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle)

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle) Hardcover – July 29, 2008

This classic, definitive series continues with this volume on German armored vehicles from 1905-1945. Spielberger, a leading expert in the field of German military vehicles, presents the wide variety of four-, six-, and eight-wheeled types and their wide range of uses in this richly illustrated technical documentation. Types include the WWII era Sd.Kfz.231, Sd.Kfz.222, Sd.Kfz.232, and many others from a wide variety of manufacturers.

Click here!

 

 

German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard)

German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard) Paperback – October 31, 2006

Panzer warfare is synonymous with the Wehrmacht of World War II. This book examines the story of the Panzer's more mysterious ancestors, the little-known panzers of the Great War. Germany was very slow to develop armored vehicles compared to Britain and France. Early attempts such as the Marienwagen of 1915 were technical failures, discouraging further design efforts until the utility of the tank was proven by the British and French in 1916-17. Efforts to catch-up proved difficult, and only a couple dozen German A7V tanks were completed in time to take part in the final campaigns of 1918. As a result, the majority of German panzer units actually used captured British tanks, the Beutepanzer. This book will trace the development of German panzers of the Great War, including the A7V and its intended but unfinished stablemates. Also included will be an overview of the use of panzers by the German Army in World War I including both A7V and Beutepanzer units.

Click here!

 

 

The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book)

The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book) Hardcover – December 1, 1990

, 240 pages illustrated with over 25 black ans white photographs and line drawings, SIGNED by both Maxwell Hundleby and Rainer Strasheim on a label stuck down to the front pastedown

Click here!

 

 

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history)

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history) Paperback – July 1, 1990

This book covers the earliest forms of German armored fighting vehicles used primarily in WWI.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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