Ranks of the French Air Force

The grade designations of the Air Force differ only with the generals of those of the army.

Since 1 January 2010, the "Corps des commissaires de l'air" has been integrated into the central "Service du commissariat des armées".

Air Force personnel are divided into three groups:

- Navigation personnel - le corps du personnel navigant

- Maintenance personnel - le corps des mécaniciens

- Base personnel - le corps des bases

As a distinctive mark to the respective groups, a colored name tag is worn:

- Navigation staff: red with a star

- Maintenance staff: purple with a gear

- Base personnel: blue without badge

- Administration: otter brown with an acanthus leaf

The shoulder pieces, which were previously equipped with a circulating wire in the color in question, are carried on only by the Air Force Commissars and Air Force doctors.

The Luftwaffe Pioneers wear special black velvet rank insignia with pinned weapon armor and the Air Force Eagle (Charognard vulture).

 

 

 

Team's ranks of the French air force

- Aviateur (Aviator)
- Aviateur de première classe (First class aviator)
- Caporal (Corporal)
- Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)
- Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)
- Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)

 

Team's ranks of the French air force

Team's ranks of the French air force

Aviateur (Aviator)(1), Aviateur de première classe (First class aviator) (2), Caporal (Corporal) (3), Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)(4), Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)(5), Caporal-chef (Master Corporal)(6)

 

 

 

Noncommissioned officers of the French air force

- Sergent (Sergeant)
- Sergent-chef (Chief sergeant)
- Sergent-chef (Chief sergeant)
- Adjudant (Adjutant)
- Adjudant (Adjutant)
- Adjudant-chef (Chief Warrant Officer)
- Major (Major)

 

Noncommissioned officers of the French air force

Noncommissioned officers of the French air force

Sergent (Sergeant) (7), Sergent-chef (Chief sergeant)(8), Sergent-chef (Cadet) (9), Adjudant (Adjutant) (10), Adjudant (Adjutant) (11), Adjudant-chef (Chief Warrant Officer)(12), Major (Major) (13)

 

 

 

Officer's schoolboy of the French air force

- Élève-officier du personnel navigant (Cadet Officer Aircrew)
- Aspirant première année (First-year aspirant)
- Aspirant (Aspirant)

 

Officer's schoolboy of the French air force

Officer's schoolboy of the French air force

Élève-officier du personnel navigant (Cadet Officer Aircrew) (14), Aspirant première année (15), Aspirant (Aspirant) (16)

 

 

 

Staff and subaltern officers of the French Air Force

- Aspirant (Aspirant)
- Sous-lieutenant (Second lieutenant)
- Lieutenant (First lieutenant)
- Capitaine (Captain)
- Commandant (Major)
- Lieutenant-colonel (Lieutenant colonel)
- Colonel (Colonel)

 

Staff and subaltern officers of the French Air Force

Staff and subaltern officers of the French Air Force

Aspirant (Aspirant) (17), Sous-lieutenant (Second lieutenant) (18), Lieutenant (First lieutenant) (19), Capitaine (Captain) (20), Commandant (Major) (21), Lieutenant-colonel (Lieutenant colonel) (22), Colonel (Colonel) (23)

 

 

 

Generals of the French air force

- Général de brigade aérienne (Air Brigadier General)
- Général de division aérienne (Air division general)
- Général de corps aérienne (Air Force General)
- Général d'armée aérienne (General of air army)

 

Generals of the French air force

Generals of the French air force

Général de brigade aérienne (Air Brigadier General) (24), Général de division aérienne (Air division general) (25), Général de corps aérienne (Air Force General) (26), Général d'armée aérienne (General of air army) (27)

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

The French Air Force in the First World War: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives (Images of War)

The French Air Force in the First World War: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives (Images of War) Paperback – March 9, 2018

The French air force of the First World War developed as fast as the British and German air forces, yet its history, and the enormous contribution it made to the eventual French victory, is often forgotten. So Ian Sumner's photographic history, which features almost  200 images, most of which have not been published before, is a fascinating and timely introduction to the subject. The fighter pilots, who usually dominate perceptions of the war in the air, play a leading role in the story, in particular the French aces, the small group of outstanding airmen whose exploits captured the publics imagination. Their fame, though, tends to distract attention from the ordinary unremembered airmen who formed the body of the air force throughout the war years. Ian Sumner tells their story too, as well as describing in a sequence of memorable photographs the less well-known branches of the service the bomber and reconnaissance pilots and the variety of primitive warplanes they flew.

Click here!

 

 

The Rise and Fall of the French Air Force: French Air Operations and Strategy 1900-1940

The Rise and Fall of the French Air Force: French Air Operations and Strategy 1900-1940 Hardcover – April 19, 2018

On 10 May 1940, the French possessed one of the largest air forces in the world. On paper, it was nearly as strong as the RAF. Six weeks later, France had been defeated. For a struggling French Army desperately looking for air support, the skies seemed empty of friendly planes. In the decades that followed, the debate raged. Were there unused stockpiles of planes? Were French aircraft really so inferior? Baughen examines the myths that surround the French defeat. He explains how at the end of the First World War, the French had possessed the most effective air force in the world, only for the lessons learned to be forgotten. Instead, air policy was guided by radical theories that predicted air power alone would decide future wars.

Baughen traces some of the problems back to the very earliest days of French aviation. He describes the mistakes and bad luck that dogged the French efforts to modernize their air force in the twenties and thirties. He examines how decisions made just months before the German attack further weakened the air force. Yet defeat was not inevitable. If better use had been made of the planes that were available, the result might have been different.

Click here!

 

 

Dassault Rafale (French Air Force and Navy Aircraft)

Dassault Rafale (French Air Force and Navy Aircraft) Paperback – October 11, 2017

Designed in the mid-1980s, the Dassault Aviation Rafale, entered service in 2004 for the Navy and in 2006 for the Air Force, the divergent needs having forced France to dissociate the European partners provided early in the project (Germany, UK, Spain and Italy).

Flagship of French aviation, the Rafale has incomparable advantages: versatility, stealth, versatility or multi-role capability. Despite the capabilities. it remained in the shadows for years in terms of international export.

Recent geopolitical developments are set to change the game and Rafale finally recorded its first commercial success with orders from Qatar, Egypt and perhaps India.

This book, illustrated with about 200 photos and thirty profiles in color, will address the three versions of the aircraft: the Rafale C (single seat aircraft for the Air Force), the Rafale M (designed by the Navy ti integrate with carrier) and Rafale B (Two-seater).

Click here!

 

 

Cn1022 - Operation Daguet : French Air Force in the Gulf War

Cn1022 - Operation Daguet : French Air Force in the Gulf War Paperback – Import, 1991

Operation Daguet is written by Eric Micheletti and published by Concord Publications Company. The book spotlights the contributions of the French Air Force during the Gulf War. It comes with commentary, color and black and white photos.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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