The navy

The term navy is used to describe the sea-going ships of a nation that has a military character. This includes the aircraft used in the Navy, helicopters, marines, coastal defense, etc.
Other names for the term navy would be naval force or war navy.

 

Responsibilities:

The main task of the Navy is the mastery of the sea. This includes the safe transport of goods and soldiers by sea and securing the coasts against enemy landings or shelling.

Likewise, the disruption, interruption or suspension of the logistical activities of the enemy into the area of responsibility of the Navy. This includes the attack or the application of merchant ships and their escorts.

The naval force can also be used for police tasks in the sense of fighting pirates. She may also be responsible for monitoring environmental regulations.

 

 

Structure:

Since maritime military units have existed, ships have also been divided into fleets or formations. These schedules are grouped according to the number of ships selected for a particular action or according to their role.

Today's naval forces are divided into fleets according to their location:

US Navy
- 2nd Fleet = Stationed in the Atlantic
- 3rd Fleet = Central and Eastern Pacific
- 4th Fleet = Caribbean and Central and South America
- 5th Fleet = Middle East
- 6. Fleet = Mediterranean
- 7. Fleet = West Pacific and Indian Ocean

US Flottenverband

US Fleet Association

 

Russian navy
- Northern Fleet or Northern Fleet
- Pacific Fleet
- Black Sea Fleet
- Baltic Fleet
- Caspian flotilla
- Naval Aviation
- Marine Infantry
- Coastal Artillery

Next, fleets can be divided into small and very small groups (flotilla or squadron).

 

 

Equipment:

Maritime forces have been used to dominate the Mediterranean area since ancient times, among the Carthaginians, Greeks and Romans.
The warships in the period were simple, wooden-built ships, in which was set to ground to fight the enemy.
The attack technique was based for many centuries on the ramming of the ships to sink them. Later, it was next to disguises over, in which the first marines were on the enemy ships and captured the crew or killed. Subsequently, the ship was sunk or integrated into its own navy.

In the Middle Ages, ships were getting bigger and better equipped with new technologies. With the advent of gunpowder and the introduction of ship cannons, the tactics of ramming and boarding changed to those of long-range fire.

With the advent of steel processing at the end of the 19th century, the warships made of wood also lost more and more importance. These were gradually replaced by metal ships. Other technologies also led to a great leap forward in maritime naval warfare, culminating in the capital warships of the 1st and 2nd world wars.

After the Second World War or even during the Pacific War, the advantages of the new aircraft carriers became apparent, which displaced the big battleships after the war. Likewise, submarines became an integral part of the worldwide naval forces.

 

 

Identification:

Military ships are usually easy to spot. However, there are also the Seekriegsflaggen, on which one can recognize the nationality and the military use.

 

 

German Empire 1903-1919

 

German Empire 1935-1945

 

German Democratic Republic Warships 1955-1990

 

 

 

Navy Armed Forces Worldwide:

Egyptian Navy
- 16,000 Soldier
- 8 frigates
- 2 helicopter carriers
- 4 submarines
- 40 speedboats
- 50 type Kamow Ka-52 helicopters (bought for helicopter carriers)
- 12 helicopters, type Gazelle
- 5 helicopters type Sikorsky S-61 Sea King

Albanian Navy
- 1,100 Soldier
- 1 Corvette
- 2 patrol boats
- 2 minelayers
- 1 supply ship
- 30 speedboats

Algerian navy
- 6,000 Soldier
- 3 frigates
- 6 Corvettes
- 24 speedboats
- 3 landing craft
- 3 surveillance vessels
- 1 SAR ship
- 1 training ship
- 2 submarines (2 more ordered)

Angolan Navy
- 2,500 Soldier
- 7 speedboats
- 1 aircraft carrier

Argentine Navy
- 9 Corvettes
- 5 destroyers
- 14 patrol boats
- 3 submarines

Royal Australian Navy
- 13,400 Soldiers
- 12 frigates
- 6 submarines
- 8 landing craft
- 14 patrol boats
- 6 minesweepers
- 16 helicopters type Sikorsky S-70
- 24 helicopters type Sikorsky MH-60 ordered

Navy of Bahrain
- 700 Soldier
- 1 frigate
- 2 Corvettes
- 4 missiles speedboats
- 4 patrol boats
- 1 supply ship
- 1 multi-purpose landing craft
- 2 helicopters Tyüp Bo 105 CBS-4
- 2 helicopters type Eurocopter Dauphin

Belgian Navy
- 1,590 Soldier
- 2 frigates
- 1 river patrol boat
- 6 minesweepers
- 1 research ship
- 1 sail training ship
- 1 support ship
- 1 leadership / support ship
- 2 coastal tugs
- 3 harbor tugs

Brazilian Navy
- 48,600 Soldiers
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 3 missile frigates
- 7 frigates
- 4 Corvettes
- 5 submarines
- 11 Douglas A-4 Skyhawk fighter-bombers
- 7 helicopters type A S332 / AS 532
- 18 helicopters type AS 350
- 8 helicopters type AS 355
- 5 Type Bell 206 helicopters
- 1 helicopter type EC 725, 15 ordered
- 12 helicopters type Lynx 21 on-board helicopter
- 6 helicopters type S-70B
- 12 helicopters type Sikorsky H-3 Sea King

Bulgarian Navy
- 4,100 Soldier
- 4 frigates
- 7 Corvettes
- 5 mine hunters
- 17 patrol boats
- 1 submarine

Chilean Navy
- 19,000 Soldier
- 8 frigates
- 3 Dropships
- 3 CASA C-212 transport aircraft
- 2 P-3ACH Orión sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 1 P-295 sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 5 Embraer EMB 110 sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 5 helicopters type AS532
- 9 helicopters type Eurocopter AS / SA365
- 9 helicopters type Eurocopter AS 350
- 1 helicopter type AS355
- 3 helicopters type Bell 206
- 5 helicopters type Bölkow Bo 105

Navy of the People's Republic of China
- 215,000 Soldier
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 25 destroyers
- 8 missile destroyers
- 14 frigates
- 83 missile speedboats
- 28 submarines (no exact entry possible)
- 160 landing craft
- about 792 fighter aircraft (unconfirmed)

Danish Navy
- 7,600 Soldiers
- 3 anti-aircraft frigates
- 2 command and support ships
- 1 patrol cutter
- 6 patrol boats
- 6 multi-purpose boats
- 4 inspection vessels
- 29 coastal protection ships

German Navy
- 16,000 Soldier
- 10 frigates
- 5 Corvettes
- 4 speedboats
- 13 anti-mine ships
- 5 submarines
- 19 auxiliary ships
- 8 P-3C Orion sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 2 Dornier Do 228 LM sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 21 helicopters type Sea King Mk 41
- 22 helicopters Sea Lynx Mk 88A

Estonian Navy
- 350 Soldier
- 3 mine hunters
- 1 auxiliary ship

Finnish Navy
- 5,000 soldiers
- 8 missile speedboats
- 2 patrol boats
- 6 minelayers
- 13 minesweeper

French navy
- 45,000 Soldier
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 3 helicopter carriers
- 2 destroyers
- 17 frigates
- 10 submarines
- 8 DropShips
- 9 connecting boats
- 14 patrol boats
- 15 mine hunting boats
- 7 supply vessels

Greek Navy
- 21,000 Soldier
- 14 frigates
- 22 guided missile boats
- 9 Corvettes
- 9 submarines
- 13 landing craft
- 3 refill boats
- 7 minesweepers
- 4 patrol boats

Indian Navy
- 53,000 Soldier
- 2 aircraft carriers
- 10 destroyers
- 15 frigates
- 17 submarines
- 3 supply ships
- 45 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29K Interceptor (29 more ordered)
- 8 Sea-Harrier FRS.51 interceptors
- 40 ordered HAL Tejas fighter aircraft
- 8 Tupolev Tu-142 submarine fighters
- 22 Dornier Do 228 patrol aircraft
- 4 Ilyushin Il-38 sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 4 Boeing P-8I Poseidon Sea Reclambler (4 more ordered)
- 15 ordered ShinMaywa US-2i sea reconnaissance
- 5 helicopters type HAL Dhruv
- 16 helicopters type Kamow Ka-25
- 12 helicopters type Kamow Ka-28
- 9 helicopters type Kamow Ka-31
- 32 helicopters type Aérospatiale SA316 / 319
- 27 helicopters type Westland SeaKing Mk.42
- 6 helicopters Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King

Indonesian Navy
- 26 Corvettes
- 6 frigates
- 9 minesweepers
- 2 submarines

Irish Navy
- 1,058 Soldier
- 8 patrol vessels

Israeli Navy
- 9,500 Soldier
- 3 missiles Corvettes (4 new orders)
- 10 missile speedboats
- 45 patrol boats
- 4 submarines
- 5 DropShips
- 8 support ships
- 6 helicopters type Agusta AB-206B
- 5 helicopters type Eurocopter Dauphin-AS.565MA
- 2 helicopters type Eurocopter Dauphin-SA-366G

Italian Navy
- 32,000 Soldier
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 1 helicopter carrier
- 4 destroyers
- 13 frigates
- 15 Corvettes
- 6 submarines
- 3 Dropships
- 10 anti-mine ships
- 3 supply ships
- 4 patrol boats
- 14 AV-8B + Harrier II aircraft
- 7 Breguet Atlantic sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 3 Piaggio P.180 sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 22 helicopters type AgustaWestland AW101
- 40 helicopters type NH90 (10 more ordered)

Japanese Navy
- 44,000 Soldier
- 3 helicopter destroyers / helicopter carriers
- 8 missile destroyers
- 29 destroyers
- 6 companion destroyer
- 16 submarines
- 6 speedboats
- 19 landing craft
- 27 minesweepers
- 5 supply ships
- 93 Lockheed P-3 Orion Sea Reconnaissance
- 2 Kawasaki P-1 sea reconnaissance aircraft (10 more ordered)
- 2 Shin Meiwa PS-1 submarine fighter aircraft
- 5 Shin Meiwa PS-1 submarine fighter aircraft (9 more ordered)
- 97 helicopters type Mitsubishi SH-60
- 19 helicopters type Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk
- 10 helicopters type Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stalion
- 7 ordered type AgustaWestland AW101 helicopters

Cameroonian Navy
- 2,200 Soldier
- 3 patrol boats

Canadian Royal Canadian Navy
- 8,500 Soldier
- 3 destroyers
- 12 frigates
- 4 submarines
- 12 coastal protection ships
- 2 supply ships
- 28 helicopters type Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone
- 27 helicopters type CH-124 Sea King
- 18 CP-140 Aurora sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 3 CP-140A Aurora sea reconnaissance aircraft

Kazakh Navy
- 3,000 Soldier
- 13 speedboats

Colombian Navy
- 15,000 Soldier
- 4 Corvettes
- 56 patrol boats
- 4 submarines
- 4 helicopters

Croatian Navy
- 2,500 Soldier
- 2 Corvettes
- 5 speedboats
- 7 river wax boats
- 6 landing craft
- 2 supply ships

Latvian Navy
- 11 patrol vessels
- 5 anti-mine ships
- 2 supply ships

Libyan Navy
- 8,000 soldiers
- 2 frigates
- 3 missile Corvettes
- 3 submarines
- 13 speedboats
- 6 patrol boats
- 5 minesweepers
- 2 supply ships

Lithuanian Navy
- 4 patrol vessels
- 5 anti-mine ships
- 3 supply ships

Malaysian Navy
- 14,000 Soldier
- 4 frigates
- 4 Corvettes
- 12 speedboats
- 25 patrol boats
- 2 submarines
- 4 anti-mine ships
- 6 helicopters type AS555 SN Fennec
- 6 type Super Lynx helicopters

Navy of Malta
- 7 patrol boats
- 5 port protection boats

Mauritanian Navy
- 620 Soldier
- 7 watch boats

Mexican Navy
- 58,000 Soldier
- 1 destroyer
- 7 frigates
- 127 patrol boats

Namibian Navy
- 700 Soldier
- 1 frigates
- 5 patrol boats

New Zealand Royal New Zealand Navy
- 1,900 Soldier
- 2 frigates
- 6 patrol boats
- 2 supply ships

Dutch Navy
- 10,500 Soldier
- 6 frigates
- 4 patrol boats
- 4 submarines
- 6 anti-mine ships
- 2 amphibious ships
- 1 supply ship
- 21 helicopters type Westland Sea Lynx
- 7 helicopters type NH90 NFH in testing

Nigerian Navy
- 7,000 Soldier
- 1 frigates
- 1 patrol boat
- 4 helicopters type Agusta A109
- 1 helicopter type Bell 206

North Korean Navy
- 46,000 Soldier
- 3 frigates
- 140 rocket and torpedo speedboats
- 75 patrol boats
- 26 submarines
- 270 DropShips

Norwegian Navy
- 3,350 Soldier
- 5 frigates
- 6 missile speedboats
- 6 submarines
- 6 minesweepers
- 20 landing craft

Navy of East Timor
- 36 Soldier
- 2 speedboats

Pakistani Navy
- 24,000 Soldier
- 1 destroyer
- 8 frigates
- 9 submarines
- 8 speedboats
- 9 landing craft
- 3 miners
- 9 Sea King and Sea Lynx helicopters

Paraguayan Navy
- 34 patrol boats

Peruvian Navy
- 25,000 Soldier
- 8 frigates
- 6 Corvettes
- 6 Dropships
- 7 submarines
- 5 supply ships

Philippine Navy
- 24,000 Soldier
- 101 ships (no details possible)

Polish Navy
- 14,300 Soldier
- 2 frigates
- 1 Corvette
- 3 speedboats
- 5 submarines

Portuguese Navy
- 10,400 Soldier
- 5 frigates
- 4 Corvettes
- 8 patrol boats
- 2 submarines

Romanian Navy
- 5,500 Soldier
- 3 frigates
- 3 helicopters type IAR-330 PUMA

Russian Navy
- 133,000 Soldier
- 72 submarines
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 1 rocket battle cruiser
- 3 rocket cruisers
- 9 rocket destroyers
- 9 submarine hunting ships
- 2 missile frigates
- 2 Dropships
- 11 frigates
- 18 Corvettes

Saudi Navy
- 15,500 Soldier
- 7 frigates
- 4 Corvettes
- 9 guided missile boats
- 7 mines

Swedish Navy
- 7,100 Soldier
- 11 Corvettes
- 11 patrol boats
- 5 submarines
- 11 minesweepers
- 1 mine launch

Singaporean Navy
- 5,000 soldiers
- 6 frigates
- 6 Corvettes
- 23 speedboats
- 6 submarines
- 14 coastal wax boats
- 4 minesweepers
- 8 DropShips

Spanish Navy
- 27,000 Soldier
- 11 frigates
- 3 submarines
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 14 landing craft
- 15 patrol boats
- 6 anti-mine boats
- 2 supply ships

Sri Lankan Navy
- 20,600 soldiers
- 62 speedboats and patrol boats

South African Navy
- 5,000 soldiers
- 4 frigates
- 3 submarines
- 32 patrol boats
- 2 anti-mine boats
- 2 supply ships
- 4 helicopters type AgustaWestland Lynx
- 8 Atlas Oryx helicopters

South Korean Navy
- 68,000 Soldier
- 24 frigates
- 12 submarines
- 21 Corvettes
- 1 amphibious units
- 16 Lockheed P-3 sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 24 helicopters type Westland Lynx
- 8 helicopters type AgustaWestland AW159
- 7 Type Bell UH-1 helicopters
- 8 helicopters type Sikorsky UH-60

Taiwanese Navy
- 45,000 Soldier
- 4 destroyers
- 4 submarines
- 22 frigates
- 20 patrol boats
- 86 speedboats
- 16 minesweepers
- 1 amphibious guide ship
- 15 DropShips
- 26 S-2 tracker sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 20 helicopters type S-70C Thunderhawk
- 9 helicopters type MD 500

Tanzanian Navy
- 1,000 Soldiers
- 12 patrol boats
- 7 speedboats

Thai Navy
- 71,000 Soldier
- 1 aircraft carrier
- 10 frigates
- 4 Corvettes
- 42 patrol boats

Turkish Navy
- 46,400 Soldiers
- 16 frigates
- 8 Corvettes
- 14 submarines
- 4 speedboats
- 19 missile speedboats
- 11 mine hunting boats
- 8 minesweepers
- 10 patrol boats (6 more ordered)
- 34 landing craft
- 10 supply ships
- 6 CASA CN-235 D / K sea reconnaissance aircraft
- 2 ATR-72 D / K Seeaufklärer (8 more ordered)
- 24 helicopters type SEA HAWK
- 11 helicopters type AB-212

Turkmen navy
- 500 Soldier
- 15 speedboats

Tunisian Navy
- 4,800 Soldier
- 15 speedboats
- 10 patrol boats

Ukrainian Navy
- 17,500 Soldier
- 1 frigates
- 5 Corvettes
- 1 missile speedboat
- 1 submarine
- 2 Dropships
- 2 minesweepers
- 1 mine launch

Uruguayan Navy
- 4,740 Soldier
- 3 frigates
- 3 patrol boats
- 3 minesweepers

United States Navy
- 325,143 Soldier
- 10 aircraft carriers
- 22 cruisers
- 62 destroyers
- 9 frigates
- 4 coastal protection vessels
- 9 amphibious attack ships
- 7 Amphibious Dock Ships
- 12 dock landing ships
- 2 amphibious command ships
- 73 submarines
- 11 minesweepers
- 36 auxiliary ships

Royal Navy
- 38,550 Soldier
- 1 helicopter carrier
- 2 dock landing ships
- 11 submarines
- 6 destroyers
- 13 frigates
- 22 patrol boats
- 16 anti-mine ships

Vietnamese Navy
- 39,000 Soldier
- 15 frigates
- 3 submarines (5 more ordered)
- 8 anti-mine ships
- 2 Viking Air DHC-6 Twin Otters Marine Reconnaissance (3 more ordered)
- 2 helicopters type Eurocopter EC 225 Super Puma
- 7 helicopters type Kamow Ka-27

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

The World of the Battleship: The Design and Careers of Capital Ships of the World's Navies, 1900-1950

The World of the Battleship: The Design and Careers of Capital Ships of the World's Navies, 1900-1950 Hardcover – October 15, 2018

This new volume is intended to present a global vision of the development of the world's battleships. In a collection of chapters by international, the design, building, and career of a significant battleship from each of the world's navies is explored that illuminates not just the ships but also the communities of officers and individuals that served in them and, more broadly, the societies and nations that built them.

Each chapter explains the origins of a ship, her importance as a national symbol, and her place in the fleet. This is a highly original and significant book on the great capital ships of the world.

Click here!

 

 

Aircraft Carriers: A History of Carrier Aviation and Its Influence on World Events: Vol. II, 1946-2006

Aircraft Carriers: A History of Carrier Aviation and Its Influence on World Events: Vol. II, 1946-2006 Second Edition (1st Printing)l Edition

In the post-1945 era, the aircraft carrier has remained a valued weapon despite the development of nuclear weapons, cruise and ballistic missiles, and highly capable submarines. At times, as in the early days of the Korean and Vietnam Wars and in the Falklands conflict, carriers alone could deploy high-performance aircraft to the battlefield. In other operations, such as enforcing the no-fly zones and the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, only carriers could provide the bases needed for sustained combat and support operations.

This second volume of Norman Polmar's landmark study details the role of carriers in the unification of the U.S. armed forces and strategic deterrence, fiscally constrained Great Britain, the development of British Commonwealth and ex-colonial navies, and the efforts of France and the Netherlands to rebuild their fleets. The role of the modern carrier-nine nations currently possess them-is discussed, as are the issues confronting nations that might acquire them. Chapters on the Soviet Union's effort to produce carriers are included for the first time. The development of both carrier planes and the many "oddball" aircraft that have flown from carriers-such as the U-2 spy plane-are also examined. Appendixes include comprehensive data on all carriers built and converted through 2006.

This volume is a valuable companion to the critically acclaimed Volume I, which covers aircraft carrier development and operations from 1909 to 1945.

Click here!

 

 

The World's Greatest Submarines: An Illustrated History

The World's Greatest Submarines: An Illustrated History Hardcover – October 1, 2017

In 1776, American Patriots attempted to destroy the British flagship <i>Eagle</i> using a man-operated semi-submersible, the Turtle, in New York harbour. The attack failed, but the idea stuck. Almost 90 years later, the CSS Hunley successfully  rammed into the Federal sloop USS Housatonic with a spar torpedo. The Housatonic became the first ship in naval history to be sunk by a submarine. The World’s Greatest Submarines features the most significant submarines built, from the German U-9 – which sank three British cruisers on 22 September 1914 – through the huge Japanese I-400 class to the great nuclear-powered submarines of the Cold War, such as the USS Los Angeles and Soviet Oscar class. Also included are the ‘undersea cruiser’ Surcouf; the highly successful Type VII U-boats of World War II; and the latest attack and ballistic missile submarines, such as HMS Astute, USS Virginia, the Chinese Type 094 and the Russian Yasen class. Each entry includes a brief description of the submarine’s development and history, a color profile or cutaway, key features and specifications. Packed with more than 200 artworks and photographs, The World’s Greatest Submarines is an accessible guide for those interested in naval history.

Click here!

 

 

The Encyclopedia of Warships: From World War II to the Present Day

The Encyclopedia of Warships: From World War II to the Present Day Hardcover – October 9, 2006

Ahoy, Sea Dogs and Battleship Historians! Here's a book you're bound to love. The Encyclopedia of Warships is an exciting compendium of more than 300 of the finest battleships, aircraft carriers, submarines, destroyers, and cruisers ever built.

Each ship is described in great detail and is illustrated with full-color artwork and photographs of the ship in action. You'll learn all about each vessel's design, development, and service record.

It's arranged in chronological order by type of vessel and provides a selective guide to the most important fighting vessels from WWII onward. Naval buffs will especially enjoy the meticulous specification tables featuring information on dimensions, powerplant, performance, armament, speed, and complement. This requisite reference includes legendary grey ladies like the Bismarck and the U.S.S. Enterprise.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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