Büssing A5P

In response to the demands of the German Ministry of War for its own armored cars, the Büssing company presented in 1915 the prototype of the Büssing A5P, the dimensions of which put all previously known armored vehicles in the shade.

Since the company Büssing already had several years of experience in the production of trucks, the engineers designed a heavily armored four-wheel drive vehicle, which was powered by a 90hp engine. Overall, the armored car had a dimension of 9.5 meters in length, 2.1 meters wide and 3.5 meters in height. It had a driver's seat at both ends as well as the equipment required for driving, thus allowing the vehicle to travel forwards and backwards without wasting much time.

A total of 11 hatches were available for machine guns, the crew consisted of 10 men including the commander, 1 mechanic, 2 drivers and 6 machine guns were.

Despite the all-wheel capability, the armored car moved too bumpy in the area .. also was the vehicle with 34km / h too slow, which meant that a series production was rejected by the War Department.

The three tanks already produced were still sent to the Eastern Front, where they were used in 1916 in Romania and from 1917 until the end of the war on the Russian front. The whereabouts of the 3 vehicles is unknown after the surrender.

 

 

Büssing A5P

 

Büssing A5P

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle)

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle) Hardcover – July 29, 2008

This classic, definitive series continues with this volume on German armored vehicles from 1905-1945. Spielberger, a leading expert in the field of German military vehicles, presents the wide variety of four-, six-, and eight-wheeled types and their wide range of uses in this richly illustrated technical documentation. Types include the WWII era Sd.Kfz.231, Sd.Kfz.222, Sd.Kfz.232, and many others from a wide variety of manufacturers.

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German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard)

German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard) Paperback – October 31, 2006

Panzer warfare is synonymous with the Wehrmacht of World War II. This book examines the story of the Panzer's more mysterious ancestors, the little-known panzers of the Great War. Germany was very slow to develop armored vehicles compared to Britain and France. Early attempts such as the Marienwagen of 1915 were technical failures, discouraging further design efforts until the utility of the tank was proven by the British and French in 1916-17. Efforts to catch-up proved difficult, and only a couple dozen German A7V tanks were completed in time to take part in the final campaigns of 1918. As a result, the majority of German panzer units actually used captured British tanks, the Beutepanzer. This book will trace the development of German panzers of the Great War, including the A7V and its intended but unfinished stablemates. Also included will be an overview of the use of panzers by the German Army in World War I including both A7V and Beutepanzer units.

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The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book)

The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book) Hardcover – December 1, 1990

, 240 pages illustrated with over 25 black ans white photographs and line drawings, SIGNED by both Maxwell Hundleby and Rainer Strasheim on a label stuck down to the front pastedown

Click here!

 

 

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history)

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history) Paperback – July 1, 1990

This book covers the earliest forms of German armored fighting vehicles used primarily in WWI.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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