Armored car Oberschlesien

In the course of the development and testing of heavy armored vehicles such as the A7V, the lack of potential applications and the clumsiness of such vehicles became apparent. So it came that in the course of the year 1918 several concepts for small and maneuverable armored personnel carriers of the highest army command were submitted. A total of 13 companies had concepts in which the concept of the Sturmpanzerwagen Oberschlesien was already presented in mid-1918.

This is a concept presented by Hauptmann Müller, which was taken over by the Upper Silesian metallurgical plants in Gleiwitz. The overall structure of the vehicle proved to be trend-setting for future generations of armored vehicles. So the driver sat in the front area, there was a separation from the main and engine room and the main weapon was mounted in a central turret on the vehicle.

 

Armored car Oberschlesien

Armored car Oberschlesien

 

 

Especially the drive was met with great care, the drive wheel was mounted in the middle of the vehicle. In addition, there were sprockets on both drive ends, which encircled a solid drum in an annular shape.

The vehicle was to be equipped with a 180-hp Argus aircraft engine, with the fuel tanks outside the main compartment being laid for the first time to protect the crew in the best possible way.

 

Drawing of a Armored car Oberschlesien

Drawing of a Armored car Oberschlesien

 

 

On October 5, 1918, the order was given by the supreme command of the army to have 2 test vehicles made for the time being. By the end of the war, however, these could not be implemented. A second version with Caterpillar chains and a rear drive wheel could not be implemented.

 

 

Technical specifications:

Designation: Armored car Oberschlesien
Length: 6,07 meters
Width: 2,34 meters
Height: 2,97 meters
Mass: 19 tons
maximum speed: 16 km/h
Power: 180HS
Fuel consumption: 1000 litres / 100 km
Reach: Unknown
Crew: 5 Man
Armament: 5.7 cm cannon

 

 

 

 

 

You can find the right literature here:

 

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle)

Armored Vehicles of the German Army 1905-1945 (Spielberger German Armor and Military Vehicle) Hardcover – July 29, 2008

This classic, definitive series continues with this volume on German armored vehicles from 1905-1945. Spielberger, a leading expert in the field of German military vehicles, presents the wide variety of four-, six-, and eight-wheeled types and their wide range of uses in this richly illustrated technical documentation. Types include the WWII era Sd.Kfz.231, Sd.Kfz.222, Sd.Kfz.232, and many others from a wide variety of manufacturers.

Click here!

 

 

German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard)

German Panzers 1914–18 (New Vanguard) Paperback – October 31, 2006

Panzer warfare is synonymous with the Wehrmacht of World War II. This book examines the story of the Panzer's more mysterious ancestors, the little-known panzers of the Great War. Germany was very slow to develop armored vehicles compared to Britain and France. Early attempts such as the Marienwagen of 1915 were technical failures, discouraging further design efforts until the utility of the tank was proven by the British and French in 1916-17. Efforts to catch-up proved difficult, and only a couple dozen German A7V tanks were completed in time to take part in the final campaigns of 1918. As a result, the majority of German panzer units actually used captured British tanks, the Beutepanzer. This book will trace the development of German panzers of the Great War, including the A7V and its intended but unfinished stablemates. Also included will be an overview of the use of panzers by the German Army in World War I including both A7V and Beutepanzer units.

Click here!

 

 

The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book)

The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I (A Foulis military book) Hardcover – December 1, 1990

, 240 pages illustrated with over 25 black ans white photographs and line drawings, SIGNED by both Maxwell Hundleby and Rainer Strasheim on a label stuck down to the front pastedown

Click here!

 

 

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history)

German Tanks in World War I: The A7V and Early Tank Development (Schiffer military history) Paperback – July 1, 1990

This book covers the earliest forms of German armored fighting vehicles used primarily in WWI.

Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

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